Canadian author and pythonista.

Dusty Phillips Codes

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Goals Vs Happiness

I am not a productivity coach. I don’t even like the concept of a productivity coach. I’m also not a mental health coach, although I am successfully managing mental illness, and I assure anyone dealing with depression, mania, or anxiety right now, that you matter. Things can and will get better. I haven’t written much about mental health since I rebooted my blog. Today, I want to talk about how goals affect our state of mind.

I’m about halfway into writing my first novel. Though I have plenty of writing experience, this is my first real attempt at fiction. I’ve been surprised at the difficulty! Some of my skills transfer over; I still know the basic structure of the English language and I put commas in the right places more often than not, for example. But many other things are much different. The hardest change I’ve had to make is the order I present information.

Parts in this series An Order to Learn to Program, Part 1 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 2 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 3 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 4 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 5 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 6 Part 6: Local Development This is part 6 in my series on the order to study topics related to programming.

Python 3 Object-oriented Programming 3rd Edition My publisher unveiled the third edition of Python 3 Object-oriented Programming today! This has been the culmination of several months of work. Editing and updating the second edition was a pleasure. It was gratifying to discover that the content has aged well. This was not the case with the first edition; I did extensive restructuring and rewriting before I was satisfied with the second.

One of many things I love about Python is how whitespace is an integral part of the language. Python was the first popular programming language designed with the idea that “code is read much more often than it is written.” Forcing authors to indent code in a maintainable fashion seemed a brilliant idea when I first encountered Python fifteen years ago. The lack of braces scattered throughout the code made for easier reading.

Parts in this series An Order to Learn to Program, Part 1 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 2 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 3 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 4 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 5 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 6 Part 5: Beginner programming, dynamically typed This is part 5 in my series on the order to study topics related to programming.

The venerable RSA public key encryption algorithm is very elegant. It requires a basic understanding of modular arithmetic, which may sound scary if you haven’t studied it. It reduces to taking the remainder after integer long division. The RSA Wikipedia article describes five simple steps to generate the keys. Encryption and decryption are a matter of basic exponentiation. There’s no advanced math, and it’s easy to understand their example of working with small numbers.

Parts in this series An Order to Learn to Program, Part 1 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 2 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 3 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 4 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 5 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 6 Part 4: Binary, bits, and bytes This is part 4 of my series on the order to study topics related to programming.

Whenever I start a new hobby web project, I just want to jump in and start coding. Instead, I spend many many hours trying to get authentication to work. I’ve got half a dozen half-finished “boilerplate” projects lying around that were supposed to satisfy the desire of, “next time, I can use this boilerplate and authentication will just work.” It never does. One thing I know I don’t want to do is manage my own auth database anymore.

Parts in this series An Order to Learn to Program, Part 1 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 2 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 3 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 4 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 5 An Order to Learn to Program, Part 6 Part 3: SQL Basics It’s not common to see SQL as the next language taught after HTML.